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Shop the very best meat available from professional butchery and deli in Mauritius

Oxtail

Rs 88000

Description

Oxtail is a flavorful and gelatinous cut of beef that comes from the tail of the cow. It is known for its rich, beefy flavor and its high collagen content, which gives dishes a luxurious, silky texture when slow-cooked. Oxtail is a popular ingredient in many traditional cuisines around the world, particularly in soups, stews, and braised dishes.

Sold in bags between 1.2-1.4kg.

Cooking Tips for Oxtail:

Oxtail lends itself to low and slow moist cooking. Great cooked as a casserole or stew on the hob or in the oven for a minimum of three hours, or alternatively in a slow cooker resulting in a richly flavoured dish with tender meat that literally falls off the bone.

  • Braising: The most common method for cooking oxtail is braising. The pieces are first browned to develop flavor, then slowly cooked in liquid (such as broth, wine, or a sauce) for several hours until the meat is tender and the collagen has dissolved.
  • Stewing: Oxtail is ideal for hearty stews. It is simmered in a rich, flavorful broth with vegetables and seasonings, resulting in a deeply satisfying dish.
  • Slow-Cooking: Using a slow cooker or crockpot, oxtail can be cooked on low heat for an extended period. This method is convenient and ensures the meat becomes very tender.
  • Soups: Oxtail is often used in soups, where its rich flavor and gelatinous texture enhance the broth. Classic dishes include oxtail soup and oxtail pho.
  • Seasoning: Oxtail benefits from robust seasonings. Common additions include garlic, onions, thyme, bay leaves, and a variety of herbs and spices depending on the culinary tradition.
  • Resting: Allow the oxtail to rest briefly after cooking to let the flavors meld and the juices redistribute.
  • Plating: Serve the oxtail pieces with the bone in, alongside the braising liquid or stew. The marrow inside the bones adds extra richness to the dish.
  • Accompaniments: Oxtail pairs well with a variety of sides, such as mashed potatoes, rice, polenta, or crusty bread to soak up the flavorful sauce. It is also commonly served with root vegetables and greens.

Oxtail is a flavorful and gelatinous cut of beef that comes from the tail of the cow. It is known for its rich, beefy flavor and its high collagen content, which gives dishes a luxurious, silky texture when slow-cooked. Oxtail is a popular ingredient in many traditional cuisines around the world, particularly in soups, stews, and braised dishes.

Sold in bags between 1.2-1.4kg.

Cooking Tips for Oxtail:

Oxtail lends itself to low and slow moist cooking. Great cooked as a casserole or stew on the hob or in the oven for a minimum of three hours, or alternatively in a slow cooker resulting in a richly flavoured dish with tender meat that literally falls off the bone.

  • Braising: The most common method for cooking oxtail is braising. The pieces are first browned to develop flavor, then slowly cooked in liquid (such as broth, wine, or a sauce) for several hours until the meat is tender and the collagen has dissolved.
  • Stewing: Oxtail is ideal for hearty stews. It is simmered in a rich, flavorful broth with vegetables and seasonings, resulting in a deeply satisfying dish.
  • Slow-Cooking: Using a slow cooker or crockpot, oxtail can be cooked on low heat for an extended period. This method is convenient and ensures the meat becomes very tender.
  • Soups: Oxtail is often used in soups, where its rich flavor and gelatinous texture enhance the broth. Classic dishes include oxtail soup and oxtail pho.
  • Seasoning: Oxtail benefits from robust seasonings. Common additions include garlic, onions, thyme, bay leaves, and a variety of herbs and spices depending on the culinary tradition.
  • Resting: Allow the oxtail to rest briefly after cooking to let the flavors meld and the juices redistribute.
  • Plating: Serve the oxtail pieces with the bone in, alongside the braising liquid or stew. The marrow inside the bones adds extra richness to the dish.
  • Accompaniments: Oxtail pairs well with a variety of sides, such as mashed potatoes, rice, polenta, or crusty bread to soak up the flavorful sauce. It is also commonly served with root vegetables and greens.

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